Say It Ain’t So, JR—New ‘Dallas’ More Lefty Propaganda?

When I learned that TNT would be doing a reboot of “Dallas”—a television show I well recall watching as a kid—starring key-players of the original cast, I was excited.

Now, not so much.

The show, which last ran on CBS more than 20 years ago, premiers tonight at 8 p.m. Central Standard Time with Larry Hagman donning the cowboy after all the years as the villainous “J.R. Ewing”, the foil to Patrick Duffy’s “Bobby Ewing,” the good brother. Linda Gray is also back to revise her role as “Sue Ellen,” J.R.’s wife, who I mostly remember as a character that staggered around drunk sneering at the schemes of her loathsome, conniving husband.

I still recollect the Friday night line-up on CBS, with my brother and I watching “The Dukes of Hazzard” and “The Incredible Hulk” religiously before being joined by my parents for “Dallas.” I think it was the only show we ever watched as a family and who else that was watching back in those days could forget the agonizing wait—and endless theorizing—to discover “Who Shot J.R.?”

That was good stuff. While some of the old character are back, the new series is supposed to center around a rivalry between “John Ross III,” J.R.’s son played by John Henderson, and “Christopher,” the adopted son of Bobby, played by Jesse Metcalfe:

I was really looking forward to the revamp to see the actors from the original series step back into their old roles and to learn if the new series could capture the spirit of the old one—-when it was good, back before it jumped the shark with story lines that had characters rising from the dead every other season.

Sadly, I was being naive and the new “Dallas” is most likely going to be just another vehicle for the entertainment industry to attack capitalism, specifically “Big Oil,” and spread environmentalist lefty, propaganda.

The show’s premise, from Ecorizza, an environmentalist/celebrity gossip site:

Metcalfe’s character is the developer of Ewing Alternative, and is all about promoting alternative fuel sources.

Regarding Christopher, Metcalfe explained his character, “I’m a liberal Democrat and I’m very concerned why we don’t put more time, energy and money into alternative energy sources, and why we’re so dependent on foreign oil.”

However, his cousin and J.R.’s son, John Ross III, played by Josh Henderson, won’t be hopping on the alternative energy bandwagon anytime soon. Henderson’s character is money-driven and embraces many of his father’s qualities. He will do whatever it takes to drill for oil.

In addition to Christopher’s clean energy stance, you’ll also see him driving around Southfork in an electric Tesla Roadster, which is actually the executive producer’s personal car, since one couldn’t be found locally in Dallas. Sustainability will be prevalent much more than in the original.

Ugh, did y’all get that? The bad guy is going to be J.R.’s son, a greedy oil man who wants to destroy the planet by drilling for fossil fuels—at ANY cost! The good guy is Bobby’s son, Christopher, a liberal Democrat trying to save the world by converting the family business to green energy.

I can’t stand it.

Now, I don’t even want to watch. I’m going to try to get through it tonight, however, and keep an open mind. Maybe it won’t be as bad as described….but who am I kidding? The executive producer drives an electric Telsa Roadster, for crying-out-loud.

If the show is really going in this direction, it won’t last long. Here’s hoping that the audience will connect with Henderson’s character—kind of like they did with William Shatner’s Dennis Crane on “Boston Legal”—and the show will be saved by a “Who Shot Christopher?” cliffhanger.

If so, let’s hope the character never rises from the dead.

 

 



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