PRO-LIFE SETBACK: Federal Judge Blocks Enforcement Of Restrictive Abortion Law

After a victory in the Louisiana Legislature, the state pro-life movement is now facing a bit of a setback. 

A federal judge has blocked enforcement of a new state law signed by Gov. Bobby Jindal which would have likely closed all five abortion clinics in the state. 

The law, which was authored by Rep. Katrina Jackson Lee (D-New Orleans) with bipartisan support in the legislature, mandates that abortionists have admitting privileges to a hospital within 30 miles of the abortion clinic that deal with obstetrical and gynecological services. The law forces abortion clinics to comply, or face closure. 

Set to go into effect Sept. 1, Federal Judge John deGravelles has just blocked enforcement of the law, allowing abortionists to continue performing abortions while seeking admitting privileges. Within a month, a hearing will be scheduled so that the judge can make a more “permanent ruling” on the pro-life law. 

Benjamin Clapper, the Executive Director of the Louisiana Right To Life, told the Wall St. Journal that the ruling was a minor “setback,” saying “The legal process is far from over.”

Abortion clinics in Baton Rouge and New Orleans are not included in the ruling, therefore they must abide by the pro-life law, though the admitting privileges of the clinics are unknown right now.

The abortion clinics in Shreveport, Bossier City and Metairie, all of whom have sued to overturn the law, will not be required to have admitting privileges for now. All of the abortionists working at the three abortion clinics currently have pending admitting privilege applications at nearby hospitals. 

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