Could Things Be Even Worse At The New Orleans Airport Than We Thought?

Quite possibly, it seems. Yesterday we got an anonymous message in response to our post about how badly prepared the area around the new terminal at the New Orleans airport is in terms of traffic flow, and if our correspondent is correct the traffic piece isn’t the half of what’s wrong with the new facility.

On the question of traffic, by the way, we weren’t the only ones warning that what’s coming when the new terminal opens Nov. 6 is not going to be pleasant. The Jefferson Parish council just granted the city of Kenner $50,000 to combat the traffic problem to come, though what $50,000 is going to do to solve anything is unknown.

We’ll just let this rip and you can decide for yourself whether the information within it pans out…

To whom it may concern:

I am a JPSO Deputy Sheriff and work several hours at the airport weekly. I speak with several other deputies regularly about our concerns with the new airport terminal. I’d like to express my concerns about security.

1) With the first public open house scheduled for 10/24, it shall be noted that there has been absolutely no orientation training, or walkthroughs for all of JPSO which provides security to the airport. Although a number of our deputies have managed to obtain access to the new terminal, there has been no formal orientation whatsoever and the majority of law enforcement officers that work at MSY have never set foot on the property.

2) JPSO has not issued any direction as to how to transition to the new terminal. Ask to see the Police Office during the open house. You’ll find an empty room with no tools or equipment available to provide security. There is no lockup for detainees. There is no desk, no computers, etc. The police office at the new terminal is a fraction  of the size of the old terminal. There is no plan to cease operations at the old terminal and begin operations at the new terminal.

3) The traffic situation couldn’t be more worse. I’m sure you are all available of the situation. If you exclude the politics, this article by the Hayride expresses JPSO’S concerns perfectly.

4) MSY Operations personnel do not even know how to get to their office. There is no stairwell located in that part of the airport in case of fire or power outage

5) There is an elevator shaft by Delta Sky Lounge without an elevator. Ask officials about that.

6) JPSO was not invited to any of the regular meetings that airport officials held over the last year. All security concerns were ignored and JPSO was never consulted. I believe the same applies to Fire Department. Both were excluded from all meetings and rarely, if at all, consulted on anything. Emergency services has obviously not been a concern to airport officials.

7) Speaking of fire, inquire [to] fire officials about their ability to eliminate fires on the outside ramps. I’m told there are no hookups for the hoses outside. Also ask about the gates and their ability to respond to incidents. Many issues there if you ask the right questions.

8) Ask if there’s any restrooms on the 1st floor. Told they forgot to install any restrooms on the lower level. Where will employees go?!?

9) Don’t ask any law enforcement officers any questions at the open house. chances are it’s our first time in the new airport too. Let’s pray nothing happens because we’ll be lost AF.

10) Go to the third level and stand by the railing overlooking the TSA checkpoint. Then look up the law regarding carrying firearms into the airport. (hint: open carry is allowed pre security) Imagine it on a busy day. Notice the lack of law enforcement personnel. Note that JPSO had no rifles, no access to security cameras, and no way to truly combat an active shooter situation.

Interested in more news from Louisiana? We've got you covered! See More Louisiana News
Previous Article
Next Article

Join the conversation!

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.