The Hayride

Mary Landrieu Officially Gives The Finger To Her Constituents

Mary Landrieu Officially Gives The Finger To Her Constituents
December 15
22:48 2009

In what has to be seen as one of the least surprising developments of the current political season, Louisiana Sen. Mary Landrieu has finally dropped all pretense of “centrism” or “objectivity” or “Blue Doggy-Style” and embraced Obamacare with all her bleeding heart.

The official Landrieu release reads as though it was written months ago, and it’s an awfully full-throated endorsement of legislation Landrieu has been acting as though she was on the fence about for quite some time…

“While many of us expressed cost and bureaucracy concerns about early drafts of health care reform legislation, it is clear that the product the Senate is debating is a dramatic improvement. Senate Democrats have developed a consensus that combines the best blend of private and public approaches to reduce cost, expand coverage and increase choice and competition for Americans. The Congressional Budget Office and the nation’s premier economists have confirmed that premiums will go down or remain stable, so that wages for millions of Americans can increase.

“If this bill is passed, 31 million uninsured Americans would have access to quality health care coverage. This reform bill creates an insurance exchange that will ensure that families would always have coverage – regardless of whether they change jobs, lose a job, move or get sick. We have also established immediate options for people who cannot get insurance today. About 11 percent of people in Louisiana have diabetes, and 32 percent have high blood pressure – two conditions that insurance companies could use as a reason to deny coverage. It would establish a high-risk pool to enable people who cannot get insurance today to find an affordable health plan.

“Although we eliminated the public option, about 900,000 Louisianians who do not currently have insurance and 200,000 residents who have non-group insurance could get affordable coverage through the health insurance exchange. For the 70 percent of Louisiana families that make less than $88,000 a year, the government would offer an affordability subsidy to help them purchase insurance, and a Medicaid expansion would bring health care coverage to more working families. Small businesses get help too. In Louisiana, more than 50,000 small businesses could be helped by small business tax credits to make premiums for their employees more affordable.

“Our bill has shored up Medicare for seniors, and extended the Medicare Trust Fund for an additional nine years. More than 600,000 Louisiana seniors will also begin receiving free preventive care, and thousands more will have the price of their brand-name drug in the Medicare Part D coverage gap cut in half.

“At my request, the bill also includes provisions to address part of Louisiana’s Medicaid shortfalls and to extend health care coverage to 29,000 young adults who ‘age out’ of the foster care system each year.

“These are monumental gains that will help restore fiscal responsibility to a system that has run amok with waste, fraud and abuse. While there is still some work to do, I am confident that we have found enough common ground for the Senate to seize this historic opportunity. I look forward to moving this legislation forward before the holiday recess.”

Yes, my head is spinning as well. I won’t even attempt to analyze all the dubious claims and outright lies in the statement; suffice it to say it’s Algorical.

Landrieu is awfully lucky she has five years left in her term, because her approval ratings were already in the tank before tonight’s announcement. A poll released on The Dead Pelican today shows that Landrieu’s support has completely cratered since March, when she had a 60.7 percent approval rating and an approval index of plus-3. Those numbers degraded to 54.2 percent approval and a minus-8.5 in October, and this month they’re at 45.6 and minus-22; were Landrieu up for re-election this fall she’d be seen as virtual dead meat against most of the state’s higher-profile Republicans.

But she’s not up for re-election, and Landrieu has reason to hope that the people of the state will get over her shameful behavior during the health-care debate and full-throated rebuke of her constituents today. Of course, that’s not necessarily the case for her brother Mitch, who is now running for mayor of New Orleans in the spring. The younger Landrieu is up against a gaggle of political nobodies in the mayoral race, but given that he’s been embarrassed in two previous attempts at the Big Easy’s top political prize nothing is guaranteed.

Fat chance Mitch will reel in much support from the medical community now.

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7 Comments

  1. Mike_Youngblood
    Mike_Youngblood December 16, 16:49

    Senator,

    It was my intention to write you this morning and appeal to you to cast vote against the healthcare legislation in the Senate, but I understand I am too late. You have now publicly acknowledged your support of that legislation.

    Does it tell you nothing that your own approval ratings are horrible today? Does it mean nothing to you that the overall approval ratings for the body in which you serve are at unbelievable lows? Do you not recognize that your constituents are against this legislation, and that you are not representing the people you were elected to serve in?

    Though you cleverly justify your decision to support this atrocity, suggesting that after much soul searching you are now convinced it is the best thing for the state and the country, it is clear that you withheld your public support as political leverage, and that you never intended to vote in a manner that reflects your constituents wishes.

    The people of Louisiana will not forget your voting record on this issue. Some of us are committed to assuring that doesn't happen.

  2. Mike_Youngblood
    Mike_Youngblood December 16, 16:49

    Senator,

    It was my intention to write you this morning and appeal to you to cast vote against the healthcare legislation in the Senate, but I understand I am too late. You have now publicly acknowledged your support of that legislation.

    Does it tell you nothing that your own approval ratings are horrible today? Does it mean nothing to you that the overall approval ratings for the body in which you serve are at unbelievable lows? Do you not recognize that your constituents are against this legislation, and that you are not representing the people you were elected to serve in?

    Though you cleverly justify your decision to support this atrocity, suggesting that after much soul searching you are now convinced it is the best thing for the state and the country, it is clear that you withheld your public support as political leverage, and that you never intended to vote in a manner that reflects your constituents wishes.

    The people of Louisiana will not forget your voting record on this issue. Some of us are committed to assuring that doesn't happen.

  3. Parker
    Parker December 16, 19:27

    LABI, LOGA and twelve other trade/chamber groups signed a joint letter and sent it to Landrieu today urging her to rethink her position. I agree with Mike above – Landrieu needs to realize we won't forget next time her vote comes around.

    Landrieu should not allow Congress to force seniors to pay for this bill!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=thRo1k9dGfk

  4. Parker
    Parker December 16, 19:27

    LABI, LOGA and twelve other trade/chamber groups signed a joint letter and sent it to Landrieu today urging her to rethink her position. I agree with Mike above – Landrieu needs to realize we won't forget next time her vote comes around.

    Landrieu should not allow Congress to force seniors to pay for this bill!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=thRo1k9dGfk

  5. the Leak
    the Leak December 17, 14:00

    I have a question for Landrieu, I would like her to name the people that took the time to visit her office to express support for this bill. I would also ask her if she believes her job is to do what she thinks best for the people of this state, or to abide by the people's wishes.

    It becomes clearer every day that we have a government that acts more as dictatorial, criminal entity rather than a representative government. And this won't change until we clog the hallways and throw ourselves against the corrupt machine.

  6. the Leak
    the Leak December 17, 14:00

    I have a question for Landrieu, I would like her to name the people that took the time to visit her office to express support for this bill. I would also ask her if she believes her job is to do what she thinks best for the people of this state, or to abide by the people's wishes.

    It becomes clearer every day that we have a government that acts more as dictatorial, criminal entity rather than a representative government. And this won't change until we clog the hallways and throw ourselves against the corrupt machine.

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