Vitter Rates 100 On Center For Security Policy Scorecard; What’s Mary’s Score?

U.S. Sen. David Vitter has been named a “Champion of National Security” by the Center for Security Policy. Vitter was one of only five U.S. Senators to receive a 100 percent score – the other four being Republicans Ted Cruz, Mike Lee and Tim Scott and Montana Democrat John Walsh. The Center’s rankings are based on legislators’ voting records on issues from border security to terrorist threats.

“ISIS and the Ebola virus are huge national security threats right now – but the biggest problem is that this Administration hasn’t put forward any real or comprehensive national security strategy on any front, including securing our borders,” Vitter said. “Without a secure border, we don’t just have an illegal alien crisis, we are actually increasing the threat of terrorists entering our country and the likelihood of a public health crisis. I’m honored to receive this recognition and I’ll keep fighting in the Senate for strong national security.”

Vitter has always voted against amnesty for illegal immigrants. As the Chairman of the Senate Border Security and Enforcement First Immigration Caucus, he’s been a leader in the Senate for pro-enforcement legislation and stronger border security. As a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, Vitter has also fought against the transfer of dangerous Guantanamo detainees into the United States for their detention and trials.

The Center For Security Policy, founded and led by Frank Gaffney, has “pioneered the organization, management and direction of public policy coalitions to promote U.S. national security” for a quarter-century. It scored members of the Senate on 15 key national security votes for 2013-14, among them…

1. Stop military aid to Egypt’s Morsi government. The Paul amendment (R-­‐ Kentucky) prohibited the sale, transfer or delivery of F-­‐16s, tanks and other defense platforms to the Government of Egypt, which at the time was under the control of Mohammed Morsi, leader of the Muslim Brotherhood. The vote was on the motion to table (or  end debate on) the Paul amendment. Pro-­‐national security vote: NO; Agreed to 79-­‐19, 2 not voting. (Vote #9, Jan. 31, 2013)

2. End debate on nomination of Sen. Chuck Hagel to be Secretary of Defense and proceed to confirmation vote. The Senate voted on a motion to end debate (or “motion to invoke cloture”) on the nomination of Sen. Chuck Hagel to be Secretary of Defense and proceed to an up-­‐or-­‐down vote on the nomination. Pro-­‐national security vote: NO; Agreed to 71-­‐27, 2 not voting. (Vote #23, Feb. 26, 2013)

3. Confirmation of Sen. Chuck Hagel to be Secretary of Defense. Pro-­‐national security vote: NO; Agreed to 58-­‐41, 1 not voting. (Vote #24, Feb. 26, 2013)

4. Confirmation of John Brennan to be Director of the Central Intelligence Agency. Pro‐national security vote: NO; Agreed to 63-­‐34, 3 not voting. (Vote #32, March 7, 2013)

5. Redirect foreign aid from Egypt’s Morsi government towards U.S. missile defense. The Cruz amendment (R-­‐Texas) reduced foreign assistance to Egypt’s Morsi government and increased funding for missile defense capabilities on the east coast of the United States. Pro-­‐national security vote: YES; Rejected 25-­‐74, 1 not voting (Vote #85, March 23, 2013)

6. Oppose U.S. entry into the United Nations Arms Trade Treaty. The Inhofe amendment (R-­‐Oklahoma) expressed opposition to U.S. entry into the United Nations Arms Trade Treaty (ATT), a treaty that purports to regulate international transfers of conventional weapons but also infringes upon 2nd Amendment constitutional freedoms.  Pro-­‐national security vote: YES; Agreed to 53-­‐46, 1 not voting (Vote #91, March 23, 2013).

7. Oppose provisional immigration status absent secure borders. The Grassley amendment (R-­‐Iowa) prohibited the granting of provisional immigrant status to those who have entered the United States illegally until the Department of Homeland Security has maintained effective control of U.S. borders for six months. The vote was on the motion to table (or end debate on) the Grassley amendment. Pro-­‐national  security vote: NO; Agreed to 57-­‐43 (Vote #148, June 13, 2013)

8. Oppose provisional immigration status absent increased border fencing. The Thune amendment (R-­‐South Dakota) prohibited the granting of provisional immigrant status to those who have entered the United States illegally until the completion 350 miles of reinforced, double-­‐layered fencing along the border, and prohibited the upgrading of any such individuals from provisional immigrant status to permanent resident status until the completion of 700 miles of such fencing. Pro-­‐ national security vote: YES; Rejected 39-‐54, 7 not voting (Vote #151, June 18, 2013)

9. Oppose temporary legal status for illegal entrants to the U.S. absent implementation of US-­‐VISIT. The Vitter amendment (R-­‐Louisiana) prohibited the granting of temporary legal status, or adjustment to citizenship status, to those who have entered the United States illegally, until the Department of Homeland Security certifies, and Congress concurs, that the US-­‐VISIT system has been fully implemented at every port of entry.  Pro-­‐national security vote: YES; Rejected 36-­‐58, 6 not voting (Vote #152, June 18, 2013)

10. End debate on comprehensive immigration reform. The Senate voted on a motion to invoke cloture on the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act (known colloquially as comprehensive immigration reform), and proceed to an up-­‐or-­‐down vote on the proposed legislation. Pro-­‐ national security vote: NO; Agreed to 68-­‐32 (Vote #167, June 27, 2013)

11. Provide for comprehensive immigration reform. The Senate voted on the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act (known colloquially as comprehensive immigration reform), which provides increased resources for border security while offering a “pathway to citizenship” for those residing in the United States illegally. Pro-­‐national security vote: NO; Agreed to 68-­‐32 (Vote #168, June 27, 2013)

12. Confirmation of Samantha Power to be U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. Pro‐national security vote: NO; Agreed to, 87-­‐10, 3 not voting. (Vote #200, Aug. 1, 2013)

13. Restrict transfer of unlawful enemy combatants from Guantanamo Bay. The Ayotte amendment (R-­‐New Hampshire) prohibited the use of federal funds to transfer a  Guantanamo detainee to a foreign country unless the Secretary of Defense certifies to Congress at least thirty days prior to the transfer that certain criteria have been met, and also prohibited the use of federal funds to transfer Guantanamo detainees to the United States or build/upgrade any facilities within the United States for that purpose. Pro‐national security vote: YES; Rejected 43-­‐55, 2 not voting (Vote #237, Nov. 19, 2013)

14. Allow transfer of unlawful enemy combatants from Guantanamo Bay into the United States. The Levin amendment (D-­‐Michigan) allowed the Secretary of Defense to  transfer detainees from Guantanamo Bay into the United States for detention, trial  and/or incarceration if he determines the transfer is in the national security interests of the United States, determines that actions have been taken/will be taken to address the public safety risks associated with such transfer, and notifies Congress at least thirty days prior to the transfer. Pro-­‐national security vote: NO; Rejected 52-­‐46, 2 not voting (per Senate rules on the date of the vote, this amendment required passage by a 3/5 majority) (Vote #238, Nov. 19, 2013)

15. Confirmation of Rose Gottemoeller to be Undersecretary of State for Arms Control and International Security. Pro-­‐national security vote: NO; Agreed to, 58-­‐ 42 (Vote #58, March 6 2014)

Mary Landrieu’s score on those 15 votes?

Zero. She was against the Center For Security Policy on all 15 of them.

On the House side, in which 27 votes were scored, Bill Cassidy rated an 89. The other members of the Louisiana delegation and their scores…

Rodney Alexander: 100
Charles Boustany: 89
John Fleming: 96
Vance McAllister: 92
Cedric Richmond: 22
Steve Scalise: 89

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