Rasmussen Poll Says Americans Are Fed Up With Islam

Some incredibly interesting poll numbers which don’t reflect all that well on CAIR and other Muslim groups’ attempts to make themselves into an aggrieved minority, or the efforts of our political class to sell us on the idea that jihadist terror isn’t actually Islamic…

Most U.S. voters agree Islam needs to put the emphasis on peace.

The Muslim president of Egypt is calling for a revolution in his religion, saying that some of its beliefs have made it “a source of worry, fear, danger, murder and destruction to all the world.” Seventy-five percent (75%) of Likely U.S. Voters agree that Islamic religious leaders need to do more to emphasize the peaceful beliefs of their faith, according to the latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey. Just seven percent (7%) disagree, while 17% are not sure. (To see survey question wording,click here.)

Fifty-two percent (52%) believe Islam as practiced today encourages violence more than most other religions. Twenty-eight percent (28%) say that’s not the case, but 20% more are undecided.

Sixty-four percent (64%) of voters think there is a global conflict in the world today between Western civilization and Islam. Only 19% disagree, but nearly as many (17%) aren’t sure. These views have changed little in surveys for the past three years.

Naturally, there is a degree of incoherence on the part of the public where Islam is concerned…

It has been reported that the attackers in Paris shouted an Islamic expression of faith and also that they had avenged the prophet Mohammed after they killed several people in the magazine’s office. However, only 24% of Americans think the actions of the killers represent the true beliefs of Islam.

Just 16% of U.S. voters said the Taliban in Afghanistan represent true Islamic beliefs following their massacre of 130 school children in Pakistan, and 27% say that of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS).

In other words, three quarters of Americans don’t have the first clue about what Islam actually is, or the history of how it was spread. Which is not a surprise, given the state of American education and the refusal of the entertainment industry to touch the story of Mohammed and the rise of his religion. And of course the latter is more or less understandable; just look at what happened at Charlie Hebdo for the crime of joking about Islam. If somebody tried to give Mohammed the Last Temptation of Christ treatment, they wouldn’t last to the end of the week.

So ignorance is bliss. And since most Americans haven’t read the Koran or the Hadith to gain any objective knowledge about Islam, they’ll just assume its message is more or less the same as Judaism or Christianity and that if anybody is a Muslim terrorist they’re just doing it wrong. Which is why you’ll occasionally run across the people who say that jihad is the same as the Westboro Baptist Church crowd or the nuts who bomb abortion clinics. They don’t know what they’re talking about.

But even not having a clue what Islam actually is, it’s obvious to the American people that we have a problem with Islam, that the problem is civilizational and Islam isn’t compatible with Western civilization and culture and that Islam needs to change if it’s going to learn how to play well with others on this planet.

Which means that political correctness and multiculturalism, at least with respect to Islam, isn’t cutting it. The public understands there’s a problem and that it’s of vast scope.

Meanwhile we have an administration which won’t even admit the cause of global terrorism is predominantly Islamic jihad. If that’s not a dangerous fundamental disconnect our readers are welcome to tell us what it is.

 

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